Tag: korean food

Rice in triangle kimbap

Korean Rice: Mepssal

Like many countries in East Asia, traditional South Korean meals predominantly center around a bowl of rice. The significance of rice in Korean food culture cannot be overemphasized or dramatized. Not only is it a daily stable served at most meals, but it is also part of the cultural identity of South Korea stemming from hardships, survival, and social resilience. If you wish to learn about Korean culture, it is important to know about rice. Here, I will write about ‘mepssal,’ the type of rice used most commonly at a Korean dinner table.

An over heat shot of a Korean grits bowl--grits topped with spinach, kimchi, ground pork, green onions, and sesame

Korean Grits Bowl (Southern-Korean Fusion Dish)

We love making Southern-Korean ‘grits bowls.’ Instead of the usual southern grits topping options such as ‘shrimp & grits’ or ‘breakfast grits,’ we top this Lowcountry southern comfort food with typical Korean flavors. Here, we give a recipe for one of our favorite fusion ‘grits bowls.’ We combine grits with some Korean marinated ground pork, soy sauce sauteed spinach, and friend kimchi! 

Seaweed sheets sitting in a blue bowl next to chopsticks

Dried Seaweed Sheets Used in Korean Cuisine

In much of Asia, people use edible dried seaweed sheets in much of their cooking. You may recognize that people use these sheets to make Japanese sushi or Korean kimbap. In America, we often use the Japanese term ‘nori’ to refer to these dried seaweed sheets. That being the case, if you are learning to cook Korean food, you will often see the seaweed referred to as ‘gim’ or ‘kim’ (김) in Korean recipes.

White kimchi sitting next to steamed pork

Kimchi Container: How to Store Your Kimchi

Every fall, families across South Korea come together to make their national dish: kimchi. The process is labor-intensive. Once made, people divide the kimchi into different containers to take home and store. I recently wrote about kimchi refrigerators and why people use them in South Korea. Now, I want to go over different types of kimchi containers people use. After all, once you make the kimchi, you need to be able to store it properly!  

An overhead shot of chunjang and a container of the paste

What Is Chunjang Paste? (Korean Black Bean Paste)

Like in the United States, South Korea has a huge Chinese food takeout culture. Also like in the United States, Korean Chinese food has adapted and changed until it no longer tastes authentic to match the Korean preferences and palate. Undoubtedly, the most famous Korean-Chinese dish in and outside of South Korea is jjajangmyeon, a wheat noodle dish topped with a thick brownish-black sauce. The sauce used for jjajangmyeon is known as jjajang (짜장)–otherwise known as ‘fried sauce.’ The main ingredient of the jjajang sauce is ‘chunjang’ (춘장). Here, we will discuss chunjang as an ingredient as well as Korean-Chinese dishes made using this sauce.